Garden View | Recipe for Eden

On Sunday with the coastal fog being a little more than coastal, I decided to head to the Mediterranean and have a quick visit to South Africa and Western Australia too.  No I haven’t discovered Time Travel (oh, how I wish) but instead went to see what the Eden Project was up to in the…

in my garden | april

“Oh, spring is surely coming, Her couriers fill the air; Each morn are new arrivals, Each night her ways prepare; I scent her fragrant garments, Her foot is on the stair.” ~ John Burroughs from ‘I hear the wild geese honking’ Spring was late this year. In March we had two unlikely falls of snow,…

in my garden | signs of spring

Some signs of spring in the garden this weekend. One orange tulip which is from the ones I planted last year and I believe is ‘Orange Emperor’ and another in bud which is from my new selection. A few stalwart pansies have survived the snow, though the ones in the north-facing courtyard are looking less…

in my garden | first signs of spring

A new variety of crocus planted last autumn finally opened this week in the lovely sunshine we have enjoyed. So nice to have rain-free days again! The tightly closed blue flower is  Iris reticulata ‘Harmony’.

in my garden | October

The end of October and it is calm and still with a watered-silk sky and weak sunshine. The sun is low in the sky now, its trajectory only covers half the distance it did in the summer months. On Sunday the clocks went back to GMT and the sun now sets at 5 pm.  My…

in my garden | autumn

I was hoping for an Indian Summer, like we had last year, to get out into the garden, but that wasn’t to be. It has been a mixed up month here weatherwise; one day sunny and sparkly the next misty and grey. And wet. We have lit the woodburning stove on three occasions as it…

in my garden | Summer’s End

The monthly update on my garden went somewhat awry due to a family emergency in early July which meant my being away from home for most of the month. Arriving back in early August with the invalid in tow I found that the slugs and snails had once again decimated the few vegetables that I…

in my garden | wandering sailor

Cymbalaria muralis: can often be seen on dry-stone walls. It actually arrived in this country as stowaway seed in packaging around imported Italian sculptures several centuries ago. Tiny scalloped green leaves form a flat mat, studded by miniature mauve-purple snapdragon-like flowers in spring. Also known as ivy-leaved toadflax, Kenilworth ivy, coliseum ivy, Oxford ivy, mother of thousands, and pennywort. (in my garden will be…