Six on Saturday | Hello September!

Last year my first September post featured the Japanese anemones, cyclamen and my flowering Amarine. Nothing to see from the Amarine pot this year, but I’m not losing hope just yet! Having had to stop any further work in the garden due to injuring my back last week (plus the garden waste bin is full) I took my camera out for a walk yesterday in the lovely sunshine.

My two Sunpatiens are flowering well in the front shady courtyard and seem to survive the S&S which as you can see, attack my poor little Hosta ‘Blue Mouse Ears’ which are supposed to be less enticing to the molluscs. Last week I showed you the white one, today the pink though it is difficult to capture the exact colour on the camera.
Continuing with the pink theme, here is Hydrangea ‘Vanille Fraise’ just beginning to turn that lovely raspberry pink colour. I have only got four flowers on this plant this year.
My only surviving Chocolate Cosmos is often hidden by the Daylilies, but now that they have been cut back a bit, this flower can shine.
Japanese anemone ‘Wild Swan’ is a very pretty pure white with bright yellow centres and a bluish back. It is quite a compact variety and I’m going to remove it and try planting some in the woodland walled border.
This is Fuchsia ‘Alice Hoffman’ with an abundance of pendent, rich pink and white flowers throughout the summer. She is a compact shrub, but hardy and enjoys full sun or partial shade.
I have had this clematis ‘Polish Spirit’ for a few years, but it has never flowered. I didn’t think it was going to this year either, but then I noticed these blooms in the clematis hedge along the woodland border. The hedge consists of C. Montana, the wild clematis, ivy, honeysuckle and brambles! So easily lost! It is supposed to be a vigorous plant so I am hoping now it is established it does well next year.

I had a lovely couple of days with my daughter in Surrey last weekend and for a change helped her with her garden which is very heavy clay. I took quite a few cuttings down in the hope that some might survive, but she has an even bigger slug problem than I do! They have even destroyed roses and hydrangeas! If anyone has any plants they can suggest for such a garden then please let me know in the comments.

And as a bonus a flower from my daughter’s garden – a shrub she didn’t know the name of – but full of bees. I’m now wondering if I should have taken some cuttings…

As always, if you want a peek over other people’s garden walls then please pop over to our host, the lovely Jon, AKA ‘The Propagator’ where you find links to many more wonderful garden enthusiasts from all over the world.

See here for the participant’s guide.

Six on Saturday

55 Comments Add yours

  1. Polish Spirit has always done well for me but not this year unfortunately when it produced only a few flowers. I expect yours will go from strength to strength now it’s got going That’s a lovely fuchsia. Those are some voracious slugs! If they’ll eat the roses I expect nothing is safe. Sedums, ferns, acanthus and eryngiums spring to mind.

    1. Heyjude says:

      Thanks for the ideas, I did take her some ferns so hopefully they will grow. And I have eryngiums to dig up if I can get the tap root out in one piece!

  2. I’d definitely be taking a cutting of the Caryopteris if I was you. I’m going to see if I can find one locally for my garden.

    1. Heyjude says:

      Yes, apparently it is quite easy so next time I am there I shall take a few cuttings. It is a lovely shrub and hers was full of bees.

  3. n20gardener says:

    Euphorbia seems to be untouched here and of course hardy geraniums. But eating the roses – how dare they!
    Japanese anemone is lovely, so bright and clear.

    1. Heyjude says:

      Daren’t plant anything poisonous or irritating as she child minds and has a cat and dog. I’ve given her a load of hardy geraniums. Weird about the rose, one is perfect, the other covered in slimy trails and not a single leaf left.

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