Six on Saturday | Mid-May 2022

Mid May already! We are almost half way through this year and it feels to be going altogether far too fast for me. Things are popping up in the garden quicker than I have time to notice, including cleavers and bindweed! Until Wednesday we hadn’t had a lot of rain or wind here in the far west of the county during early spring, which was good for the tulips as they weren’t blown over or snapped as often happens, although I had to water the containers. With the wind on Wednesday following overnight rain the last of the tulips are sadly over for another year. But I have enjoyed them for almost 6 weeks.

So here are six more things to enjoy this Saturday.

Planting around the large flat rock

Those who have been following me for a long time will remember that in the middle of my garden is a large flat granite rock which was the main inspiration for my creating a gravel garden. I have removed the lawn that was originally all around it and now have quite a few grasses and other airy planting. Above you can see the thalictrum and Geum ‘Red Wings’. I am surprised at how tall the Geum is! The flower stems struggle to keep upright. Some of this perennial planting was new last year so I am glad to see most things are coming up again including the Santolina chamaecyparissus in the foreground which looks like it will flower this year.

Thalictrum ‘Black Stockings’This was an impulse buy late last year and to be truthful I had forgotten about it. When the leaves appeared I wondered whether it was a self-sown Aquilegia until the dark purple stems appeared. I think it is ‘Black Stockings’ as admired in the Prop’s own garden. It is a tall (180cm) stand out plant with lacy foliage and upright, near-black stems bearing generous sprays of fluffy, bright purple flowers and supposedly does not require staking!

My Aconite / Monkshood has reappeared in the woodland border, bigger and bolder than ever, but the colour matches perfectly with my newly grown Dutch irises (‘Metallic Mixture’) which are just beginning to open. The last of my narcissi have opened too – these are the late flowering N. poeticus or poet’s daffodil / pheasant’s eye. This bunch are in a container, but I must find space for them in a border. They have a lovely scent, but they also appear to attract the S&S.

Finally, the first of my roses to open is R. ‘Fighting Temeraire’ which has a lovely mix of pink, peach and yellow and flowers all through the summer.

The header photo is of the Asda clematis montana which has come into its own this month, creeping nicely along the fence, but also heading up into not only my tree but also the neighbours! Oops! I’d better get round there and do some clipping and tying in I think. Plus FMNs to remove and the Erigeron karvinskianus to hack back.

I hope everyone is enjoying the spring sunshine, it’s a busy time for gardeners!

As always, if you want a peek over other people’s garden walls then please pop over to our host, the lovely Jon, AKA ‘The Propagator’ where you find links to many more wonderful garden enthusiasts from all over the world.

See here for the participant’s guide.

Six on Saturday

55 Comments Add yours

  1. This year is definitely going to fast! Amelia

  2. susurrus says:

    Great to see ‘Fighting Temeraire’ looking so good, and with forget-me-nots too. Mum has one, but there isn’t really room for it where she has it, so it gets pruned back too hard.

  3. The garden around the granite rock is looking really lovely. The Thalictrum looks beautiful with its black stems and mauve flowers. The rose is a beauty!

    1. Heyjude says:

      The thalictrum was such a surprise as I had forgotten buying it! It’s a lovely plant, I’m tempted to buy a white one.

  4. Beautiful, as always. I’m dreading seeing the weeds in our garden. It’s been raining almost all the time we’ve been away.

    1. Heyjude says:

      Turn of the bindweed now which grows 6 inches in a day! One reason I don’t like leaving the garden in spring is how fast things grow (plus I’d miss my tulips)

      1. Yes, you need to be home for them.

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