Six on Saturday | April Showers

It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.

Charles Dickens

The above quote could well be true of the weather this week, with sunshine and a lot of windy weather thrown in. But the spring flowers keep on coming and the trees are greening up. Every day there is something new to see and I am forever peering down at plants for signs of life.

(Please click on any image to scroll through the gallery)

My tulips are appearing thick and fast now, but I’ll save most of them for later in the month. (1) Tulipa ‘Peppermint Stick’ has made a welcome return in one of my little  half barrels along with the forget-me-nots. There were wallflowers planted here too, but they seem to have died off.  These are small hybrid tulips with eye-catching, narrow and pointed, white flowers striped with cherry red lines on their outer tepals looking very much like the old-fashioned peppermint striped rock.

(2) A new selection this year are Tulipa ‘Purple Ladies’ crammed into the Verdigris planter and looking quite lovely. They are  a subtle blend of deep purple with pink and blue overtones

(3) A view of the garden from the Zen Patio reveals so much colour in the spring garden now. Mostly tulips both in containers and the ground with the white flowers in front of the fence being  Narcissus ‘Pueblo’ which start off yellow and gradually become pure white. This is the third year of flowering. Over the fence in the far field you can see the dairy herd out enjoying the new grass.

(4) Brunnera macrophylla ‘Sea Heart’ grows under the twisted hazel tree with its forget-me-not like flowers, just a shade or two darker. Although slightly nibbled by something, it fares much better than hostas.

(4) Brunnera

(5) I have two Epimediums, one under the hazel and the more golden one under the Kilmarnock Willow. They have similar coloured flowers, but different leaves.  I think they are ‘Amber Queen’ and ‘Orange Queen’, but I could be wrong. The new leaves are quite dramatic, but the flowers are very difficult to photograph.

And at (6) is a Japanese Acer – a blood red one – but Acers are difficult to grow here as it is far too windy and the delicate leaves get badly scorched. I keep this in a container and sheltered under the hazel, but it is very slow growing. At this time of the year the new leaves do look rather gorgeous backlit by the sun.

The yellow tulips you see in the header image are imposters. I think they should be Ballerina, which are orange, but Sarah Raven must have mixed up the labelling. I shall be having words once I have confirmed which of the six bulb varieties I bought from her is missing.

As always, if you want a peek over other people’s garden walls then please pop over to our host, the lovely Jon, AKA ‘The Propagator’ where you find links to many more wonderful garden enthusiasts from all over the world.

See here for the participant’s guide.

Six on Saturday

57 Comments Add yours

  1. I’m going back to older posts to catch up Jude! I love tulips and those “Purple Ladies” are stunning! What a glorious zen space your garden is 🙂

    1. Heyjude says:

      Thanks Rosemary. The tulips are fabulous. I will have a round up of all the bulbs at the end of the month. Now I have to mow what’s left of the lawn and get some seeds sown and visit a nursery for some tomato plants. A busy time of the year!

      1. You obviously out so much work in Jude and it shows 🙂 I love tomato plants too – we can get them to grow well here plus chillies and my herbs. I’ll look forward to the bulb round up – spring is such a pretty time of year 🙂

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