Six on Saturday | September Blooms

It’s an exciting time of the year. Spring bulbs are starting to arrive. On the list this year are new varieties of Muscari (Night Eyes and Mount Hood) some of which are destined for an urn at the bottom of the garden, Anemones (St Brigid and Hollandia), species tulips (Persian Pearl and Sylvestris which are going to be planted in the ground by the Zen Patio) and some Purple Lady tulips that will go into the zinc container. Oh and some irises (Eyecatcher and mixed Dutch irises). I shall have to get on with the planting before the end of the month, though the tulips can wait until October.

Meanwhile still hanging on in the garden:

(1)Β  September is all about Japanese Anemones and Asters. My Asters have yet to flower, though they are in bud. My Japanese Anemone ‘Pamina’ is flowering profusely this year with very deep pink double flowers and gorgeous contrasting yellow stamens. From the odd tiny flowers at the beginning of the month it is now looking very good. Especially when seen next to Rosa Graham Thomas which is flowering again.

(2) The lovely Rosa ‘Graham Thomas’.

(3) Another look at my Zinnias. Several more in flower now and the bees love them. Unfortunately so does something else (slugs, snails, earwigs…) still it has been a joy to actually see them flower at all this year.

(4) In spring I planted three new clematis. ‘Night Veil’ flowered well in the summer months, but the other purple one ‘ASTRA NOVA’ failed to grow well and hasn’t produced a single flower. I hope it improves next year. But this Clematis tangutica ‘Lambton Park’ with its bright yellow nodding lantern-shaped flowers which are followed by beautiful silky seed-heads has scrambled up the white rose on the fence. It is supposed to have a coconut perfume, but I can’t get close enough to determine whether it has or not. Another plant that is not easy to photograph.

I planted several new plants in the new gravel area of the garden including:

(5) One of the two new grasses that I bought in May this year from Beth Chatto nursery is Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Overdam’ (Feather reed-grass) which makes arching mounds of freshly striped green and white grassy leaves topped with feathery plumes in late summer.

Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Overdam’

(6) And growing next to the two grasses is Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling Butterflies’ which is doing a grand job of floating around the feathery plumes. I once grew the pink version in my Bee & Buttefly bed, but it sprawled everywhere and when I cut it back, failed to grow again. I prefer this version, but it may be short-lived in my wet winter soil.

Gaura lindheimeri

As always, if you want a peek over other people’s garden walls then please pop over to our host, the lovely Jon, AKA ‘The Propagator’ where you find links to many more wonderful garden enthusiasts from all over the world.

See here for the participant’s guide.

Six on Saturday

29 Comments Add yours

  1. margaret21 says:

    Fabulous. I particularly like the autumn richness of your header photo.

  2. beetleypete says:

    All I have left in the garden are some overgrown shrubs, and dandelions on the lawn. Have to brace myself for the last mow of the season, and cutting back some gangly bushes. πŸ™‚
    Best wishes, Pete. x

    1. Heyjude says:

      The dandelions seem to have taken over my remaining bit of lawn! As for the last mow, that will probably be in December unless it’s too wet!

  3. fredgardener says:

    Full of promises with these bulbs! I haven’t taken a walk to the garden centre yet but probably it will happen here soon in early October.
    We both featured pretty much the same colour of Japanese anemone this week. Regarding the zinnias, mine will soon have a second flush

  4. Ann Mackay says:

    ‘Pamina’ is a gorgeous colour. I have September Charm and Hadspen Abundance which both have very small flowers in places where they’ve been too dry. Fortunately others have the normal-sized flowers. I have the same gaura – a favourite – and I find it’s not very long-lived here too. (A shame, because I’d love to have lots of it dancing through the garden!)

  5. I love Autumn too, the smells, the colours and the excitement of the bulbs planting. Thank you for the Gaura photo. This was mentioned on Gardener’s World last night and I only caught the name “whirling butterflies’. Now I know what to go out and search for. πŸ™‚

  6. Love the vibrant rose and anemone combo. I had Clematis tangutica, which is lovely but sadly got smothered by a forsythia and then died. The flowers are so dainty but a great yellow, and the seedheads are a real bonus. Nice choice of bulbs!

    1. Heyjude says:

      My second tangutica. I had one at the front in a pot but it didn’t survive the first winter. We’ll have to wait and see if this one does.

  7. I always look forward to your garden posts and enjoy the colorful displays. Zinnia here rarely survived August, let alone continue into early fall, and this year was especially harsh with extreme heat and dense smoke from area forest fires. Therefore, yours are a real treat for me!

    1. Heyjude says:

      The weather has been particularly harsh in many ways this year, I guess we just don’t know how plants will evolve or the changes we gardeners might have to make.

  8. I’m glad you’re Zinnias have survived the worst of the slugs, etc., and flowered. Great photo of the Gaura. I keep intending to include mine in an SoS but have yet to take a successful photo as they’re always dancing around in a breeze!

    1. Heyjude says:

      Yes, they are almost impossible to photograph, as are the grass plumes!

  9. Leya says:

    Thank you for some soothing flowery wslks, Jude! The Pamina looks gorgeous.

  10. Lovely, as always. Is your Japanese anemone growing in full shade? I have one and I’m hoping it will flower this year.

    1. Heyjude says:

      My pale pink one is in full sun, the other two have a bit less shade. What they like though is moist soil.

      1. It definitely has that so fingers crossed I get some flowers.

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